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Australia's 11 Best National Parks

As Mungo Jerry put it: “when the weather is hot, you can stretch right up and touch the sky, when the weather’s fine…”

Basically, it’s time to get outside and start enjoying the warm spring weather, and what better place to do it than some of Australia’s best parks?

After all, a study undertaken by America’s Stanford University (perhaps unsurprisingly) confirmed that walking in nature has a positive effect on mental wellbeing. So here is a list of parks worth a wander in…

  • Royal National Park, New South Wales

The first National Park in Australia, the Royal National Park is an excellent place to whale watch, camp, and experience a variety of walks that incorporate forest and coastline.

A Laughing Kookaburra, Dacelo novaeguineae, in Australia's Royal National Park near Sydney. This guys voice is often heard in movie jungle scenes but no self respecting Kookaburra would ever be caught dead in a jungle.
A Laughing Kookaburra, Dacelo novaeguineae, in Australia’s Royal National Park near Sydney. This guys voice is often heard in movie jungle scenes but no self respecting Kookaburra would ever be caught dead in a jungle.
  • Flinders Ranges National Park, South Australia 

With everything from mountain ranges to deep gorges to ruins from early European settlements and Aboriginal art, the Flinders Ranges National Park is located about 400km north of Adelaide.

  • Kosciuszko National Park, New South Wales

Wonderfully suited to spring time, the Kosciuszko National Park offers treks like no other. With endangered species and plants found nowhere else on the planet, this is one park to make time for if you’re looking for something different. Fishing and mountain biking are popular activities here, too.

Wild Kosciuszko National Park. New South Wales, Australia.
Wild Kosciuszko National Park. New South Wales, Australia.
  • Purnululu National Park, Western Australia

Situated in the heart of the Kimberley, Purnululu National Park is home to the beautiful Bungle Bungle Range, the existence of which is thanks to 20 million years of uplift and erosion. A truly remote experience, this is one parks that will take you out of your comfort zone – one for adventure lovers.

  • Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Northern Territory

A World Heritage site, every year thousands of people spend both time and money to see Uluru, and the experience is well worth both.

  • Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory

Home to one third of Australia’s birdlife, Kakadu is also high on the agenda for people who love fishing – there are plenty of large watering holes. Just beware the sizeable local reptiles.

Bungle Bungles at Purnululu National Park, Western Australia
Bungle Bungles at Purnululu National Park, Western Australia
  • Great Sandy National Park, Queensland

As the world’s largest sand island, Great Sandy National Park encompasses Fraser Island, which also happens to be the only place on earth where tall rainforests grow out of sand. Freshwater Lake McKenzie on the island is one for the bucket list, too.

  • Flagstaff Gardens, Melbourne

If National Parks are a little overwhelming for you, Flagstaff Gardens are the perfect place to unwind as the weather get warmer. It’s a hotspot for nearby workers on their lunch making it one of the most visited parks in Melbourne. Why not grab a bite to eat and enjoy the warmer weather in Flagstaff Gardens.

  • Port Campbell National Park, Victoria

With numerous famous tourist attractions including the Great Ocean Road and wave sculptured rocks, there is plenty to do in Port Campbell National Park. If the coast is your thing then there aren’t many better places to visit in the world.

Port Campbell Nationalpark, Australia
Port Campbell Nationalpark, Australia
  • Daintree National Park, Queensland

Daintree is home to some of Australia’s most interesting wildlife, including tree kangaroos and cassowaries. As well as this many endangered plants can be found within the park. If spring stands for renewal for you then the serenity of this place will help you to be at peace with yourself.

  • Bay of Fires Conservation Park, Tasmania

The Bay of Fires Conservation Park got its name in 1773 when Captain Tobias Furneaux noticed numerous fires breaking out across the coast. Today it boasts activities such as camping, swimming, and fishing but why not just take a moment to enjoy a nice stroll along the rocks?

Lighthouse on the Bay of Fires, Tasmania, Australia
Lighthouse on the Bay of Fires, Tasmania, Australia